Some reflections on the nature of education: An analysis of the changing landscape of Hong Kong's education in the post-colonial era

Wai Wa Timothy YUEN, Pak Sang LAI

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

Since the political handover in 1997, there has been a chain of reform initiatives aiming at enhancing the quality of educational services in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Such episodes include the issuing of a report on quality school education measures, the promulgation of a new set of education aims and the impending education reform to bring forth life-long learning. Together these would substantially transform the landscape of education in Hong Kong. This paper aims at reviewing the changing lanscape of Hong Kong's education. Particularly, the paper would explore the following: 1) the degree of continuity and change as represented in the current development 2) the paradigm shift in education especially with respect to the meaning of learning, the role of teachers and schools and the sort of personality we want to build up for the future. At the end, the paper will also point out the potential risks we need to guard against in this change period. Copyright © 2000 International Educational Research Forum.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational symposia: Shifts in education space & teacher education
Place of PublicationJapan
PublisherInternational Educational Research Forum
Pages432-446
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Citation

Yuen, W. W. T., & Lai, P. S. (2000). Some reflections on the nature of education: An analysis of the changing landscape of Hong Kong's education in the post-colonial era. In International symposia: Shifts in education space & teacher education (Vol. 2, pp. 432-446). Japan: International Educational Research Forum.

Keywords

  • Post-colonial reform
  • Paradigm shift

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