Socially oriented motivational goals and academic achievement: Similarities between native and Anglo Americans

Jinnat ALI, Dennis Michael MCINERNEY, Rhonda G. CRAVEN, Alexander Seeshing YEUNG, Ronnel Bornasal KING

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined the relations between two socially oriented dimensions of student motivation and academic achievement of Native (Navajo) American and Anglo American students. Using confirmatory factor analysis, a multidimensional and hierarchical model was found to explain the relations between performance and social goals. Four first-order goal constructs (competition, social power, affiliation, and social concern) represented by 2 higher order factors (performance and social dimensions) were found to be invariant for two cultural groups of high school students in the United States: Navajo (n = 1,482) and Anglo (n = 803). The findings suggest that the effects of performance goals are relatively stronger, and are similarly strong cross-culturally. However, Navajo students were relatively lower in achievement scores and competition goals but higher in social concern. Copyright © 2014 Islamia University of Bahawalpur.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-137
JournalThe Journal of Educational Research
Volume107
Issue number2
Early online dateNov 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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academic achievement
student
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factor analysis
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Citation

Ali, J., McInerney, D. M., Craven, R. G., Yeung, A. S., & King, R. B. (2014). Socially oriented motivational goals and academic achievement: Similarities between native and Anglo Americans. The Journal of Educational Research, 107(2), 123-137.

Keywords

  • Achievement
  • Motivation
  • Multidimensionality
  • Socially oriented
  • Structural equation modeling (SEM)