Social cues in asynchronous online discussions: Effects of social metacognition and new ideas

Gaowei CHEN, Ming Ming CHIU, Zhan WANG

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

This study examines how group members’ social metacognition and new ideas in recent messages affected a current message’s positive social cue (SC) or negative SC during asynchronous, online discussions. We modeled 894 messages by 183 participants regarding 60 high school mathematics topics (typically 8 people posted per topic) on a public, informal, mathematics problem solving website not connected to any class or school (www.artofproblemsolving.com) with a statistical discourse analysis. Results showed that group members’ agreements facilitated positive SCs, while disagreements facilitated negative SCs. Meanwhile, new ideas and justifications were less likely to be accompanied by SCs. Together, these results suggest that teachers can foster student’s construction of knowledge by encouraging polite disagreements during online collaborative learning. Copyright © 2011 International Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 2011: Conference proceedings volume II: Short papers and posters
EditorsHans SPADA, Gerry STAHL, Naomi MIYAKE, Nancy LAW
Place of PublicationHong Kong
PublisherCentre for Information Technology in Education, The University of Hong Kong
Pages776-780
ISBN (Print)9780578091532
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Citation

Chen, G., Chiu, M. M., & Wang, Z. (2011). Social cues in asynchronous online discussions: Effects of social metacognition and new ideas. In H. Spada, G. Stahl, N. Miyake, & N. Law (Eds.), The Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Conference 2011: Conference proceedings volume II: Short papers and posters (pp. 776-780). Hong Kong: Centre for Information Technology in Education, The University of Hong Kong.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Social cues in asynchronous online discussions: Effects of social metacognition and new ideas'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.