Sleep and inhibitory control over mood-congruent information in emerging adults with depressive disorder

Esther Yuet Ying LAU, Mark Lawrence WONG, Yeuk Ching LAM, Kristy Nga Ting LAU, Ka Fai CHUNG, Benjamin RUSAK

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Accumulating evidence has suggested bidirectionality between sleep problems and depression, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We assessed the role of sleep in inhibitory control ability with emotional stimuli, which has been shown to be suboptimal among individuals with depression and proposed to perpetuate depressive symptoms.
Methods: Emerging adults (aged 18–25 years, 64.6% female) were screened for depressive and other mental disorders by structured clinical interview and questionnaire. Individuals with depressive disorders were assigned to have a polysomnography-monitored daytime sleep opportunity (Sleep-Dep, n = 20), whereas nondepressed individuals were randomized to either have daytime sleep (Sleep-Ctrl, n = 27) or stay awake (Wake-Ctrl, n = 18). Participants completed the Affective Go/No-Go Task two times, separated by experimental conditions.
Results: A factorial model with a between-subject factor (Sleep-Dep/Sleep-Ctrl/Wake-Ctrl) and a within-subject factor (test 1/test 2) was used to assess if the groups differed in inhibitory control across test sessions, as inferred by changes in d-prime and false alarm rates (FA). Results from mixed factorial models showed a significant interaction effect between time and group on FA in the block with neutral faces as the target and happy faces as the nontarget (F(2,61) = 5.15, Pfdr = .045). Although Sleep-Dep had decreased FA after sleep (t(19) = 2.94, Pfdr = .050), Sleep-Ctrl and Wake-Ctrl had no significant between-session changes (p values > .05). Postsleep improvement in FA in Sleep-Dep correlated with longer stage 2 sleep (r(20) = 0.788, Pfdr  < .001) and stage 2 fast spindle number at O1 (r(18) = 0.692, Pfdr  = .015).
Conclusions: Sleep gain, particularly stage 2 sleep and related physiology, potentially enhances inhibitory control ability responding to emotional information among individuals with depressive disorders. Copyright © 2021 by the American Psychosomatic Society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1004-1012
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
Volume83
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Citation

Lau, E. Y. Y., Wong, M. L., Lam, Y. C., Lau, K. N. T., Chung, K. F., & Rusak, B. (2021). Sleep and inhibitory control over mood-congruent information in emerging adults with depressive disorder. Psychosomatic Medicine, 83(9), 1004-1012. doi: 10.1097/PSY.0000000000000996

Keywords

  • Depression and anxiety
  • Mental health
  • Executive function
  • Cognitive bias
  • Information processing
  • Nap

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