Situational differences in dialectical emotions: Boundary conditions in a cultural comparison of North Americans and East Asians

Janxin LEU, Batja MESQUITA, Phoebe C. ELLSWORTH, ZhiYong ZHANG, Huijuan YUAN, Emma Ellen Kathrina BUCHTEL, Mayumi KARASAWA, Takahiko MASUDA

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38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Past research generally suggests that East Asians tolerate opposing feelings or dialectical emotions more than North Americans. We tested the idea that North Americans would have fewer opposing emotions than East Asians in positive, but not in negative or mixed situations. Forty-seven European American, 40 Chinese, and 121 Japanese students reported the emotions that a protagonist of standardised positive, negative, and mixed situations would feel. Emotions were coded into three valence categories: pleasant, unpleasant, and neither-pleasant-nor-unpleasant. As predicted, cultural differences in opposing emotion associations were found in positive situations only. Moreover, East Asians reported more neither-pleasant-nor-unpleasant feelings, especially in mixed situations, possibly reflecting a deferral of valence appraisal due to expected change. Copyright © 2009 Psychology Press.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-435
JournalCognition and Emotion
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

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Asian Americans
Emotions
Boundary Conditions
Situational
Emotion
Asia
Students
Research

Citation

Leu, J., Mesquita, B., Ellsworth, P. C., Zhang, Z., Yuan, H., Buchtel, E., . . . Masuda, T. (2010). Situational differences in dialectical emotions: Boundary conditions in a cultural comparison of North Americans and East Asians. Cognition and Emotion, 24(3), 419-435. doi: 10.1080/02699930802650911

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Dialectical emotions
  • Pleasant and unpleasant emotions