Significance of non-level walking on transtibial prosthesis fitting with particular reference to the effects of anterior-posterior alignment

S. W. SIN, Hung Kay Daniel CHOW, Jack C. Y. CHENG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the fact that non-level walking is known to be important for prosthesis fitting, its clinical significance has not been investigated. In this study, the acceptable prosthesis alignment ranges of six subjects with transtibial amputation on level and non-level walking were determined and compared. With the aid of a recently developed alignment jig, prosthesis fitting was performed for each subject with varied anterior-posterior (AP) alignments. Conventional assessments and the subjects' comment were used to determine whether the alignment was acceptable or not. The results showed that the acceptable alignment range for non-level walking consistently fell within and was significantly smaller than that for level walking with p<0.05. It was evident that non-level walking is important for better approximation of optimum alignment and should be included in routine prosthesis fitting. Copyright © 2001 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation Research and Development Service.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
JournalJournal of Rehabilitation Research and Development
Volume38
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2001

Citation

Sin, S. W., Chow, D. H. K., & Cheng, J. C. Y. (2001). Significance of non-level walking on transtibial prosthesis fitting with particular reference to the effects of anterior-posterior alignment. Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 38(1), 1-6. Retrieved from https://www.rehab.research.va.gov/jour/01/38/1/contents.html

Keywords

  • Non-level walking
  • Prosthesis alignment
  • Prosthesis fitting
  • Transtibial amputation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Significance of non-level walking on transtibial prosthesis fitting with particular reference to the effects of anterior-posterior alignment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.