Sense of relatedness boosts engagement, achievement, and well-being: A latent growth model study

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55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine how adolescent students' sense of relatedness towards parents, teachers, and peers were differentially related to engagement, disaffection, achievement, and well-being. Two longitudinal studies were conducted among Filipino high school students. Study 1 focused on how sense of relatedness was associated with academic outcomes (engagement, disaffection, and achievement), while Study 2 focused on how relatedness was associated with well-being. Results of Study 1 showed that students' sense of relatedness predicted both initial levels and changes in engagement and disaffection, which in turn, mediated the effects of relatedness on subsequent academic achievement. Parental relatedness seemed more important for academic achievement compared to teacher and peer relatedness. In Study 2, sense of relatedness was found to be associated with positive and negative affect. Evidence for differential prediction for well-being was also found. Findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of relatedness in facilitating optimal outcomes. This study also suggests that different types of relatedness may be associated with different psychological outcomes. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-38
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume42
Early online dateApr 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Citation

King, R. B. (2015). Sense of relatedness boosts engagement, achievement, and well-being: A latent growth model study. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 42, 26–38.

Keywords

  • Sense of relatedness
  • Connectedness
  • Engagement
  • Disaffection
  • Well-being

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