Self-esteem: A cross-cultural comparison of British-Chinese, White British and Hong Kong Chinese children

Yiu Man CHAN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Total raw self-esteem scores of 1303 children, including Chinese children in Britain and Hong Kong and White British, were assessed by using the Self-esteem Inventory developed by Coopersmith (1967). Across all samples, the results show little differences between children of different ages, whereas statistically significant differences occur in the independent variables of ethnic groups, gender and educational aspiration. Despite the social disadvantages that the UK Chinese may face, they have significantly higher self-esteem than their Hong Kong Chinese counterparts, but have little differences from their White peers. This indicates that they are likely to have positive feelings and academic confidence in being themselves and as part of the host society. In contrast, Hong Kong children tend to have low levels of self-esteem, which may be caused by the more self-effacing and modest values in Chinese culture, a traditional authoritarian style of education or highly competitive pressures created by schools, families and society.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-74
JournalEducational Psychology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2000

Citation

Chan, Y. M. (2000). Self-esteem: A cross-cultural comparison of British-Chinese, White British and Hong Kong Chinese children. Educational Psychology, 20(1), 59-74.

Keywords

  • Self-esteem
  • Child psychology

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