Self-efficacy and causal attributions in teachers: Effects on burnout, job satisfaction, illness, and quitting intentions

Hui WANG, Nathan C. HALL, Sonia RAHIMI

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

105 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study expands upon prior research showing teachers' self-efficacy and causal attributions to predict adjustment and attrition in investigating the effects of self-efficacy, attributions for occupational stress, and hypothesized mediation effects on burnout, job satisfaction, illness symptoms, and quitting intentions. Findings from 523 Canadian teachers showed self-efficacy and attributions to independently predict teachers' adjustment, and revealed no empirical support for attributions as a mediator of self-efficacy effects. Results further showed self-efficacy for student engagement, and personally controllable attributions, to most strongly predict teachers' psychological well-being, physical health, and quitting intentions. Implications for professional development and intervention programs are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-130
JournalTeaching and Teacher Education
Volume47
Early online dateJan 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

Citation

Wang, H., Hall, N. C., & Rahimi, S. (2015). Self-efficacy and causal attributions in teachers: Effects on burnout, job satisfaction, illness, and quitting intentions. Teaching and Teacher Education, 47, 120-130. doi: 10.1016/j.tate.2014.12.005

Keywords

  • Teachers
  • Self-efficacy
  • Attributions
  • Burnout
  • Illness symptoms
  • Attrition

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