Self-compassion buffers the negative psychological impact of stigma stress on sexual minorities

Ka Shing Kevin CHAN, Cherry Sin Wa YUNG, George Muyi NIE

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

Objectives  The present study aimed to test the associations of stigma stress with negative cognitive outcomes (i.e., self-stigma content and process), affective outcomes (i.e., depressive and anxiety symptoms), and social outcomes (i.e., disconnectedness and loneliness) among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals and to explore whether self-compassion would moderate these associations.
Methods  A total of 401 LGB individuals from Hong Kong, China, provided cross-sectional questionnaire data on self-stigma content and process, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and social disconnectedness and loneliness. Hierarchical regressions and simple slope analyses were performed to analyze the relations among the variables.
Results  Hierarchical regressions showed significant interactions between stigma stress and self-compassion in predicting self-stigma content and process, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and social disconnectedness and loneliness. Simple slope analyses further demonstrated that the positive associations of stigma stress with the six psychological outcomes were weaker among LGB individuals with high levels of self-compassion than among LGB individuals with low levels of self-compassion.
Conclusions  Theoretically, our findings highlighted the links between stigma stress and maladaptive psychological processes among LGB individuals, as well as the potential protective effects of self-compassion in such processes. Practically, our findings pointed to the necessity of helping LGB individuals cope with stigma stress and increase self-compassion in improving their psychological well-being. Copyright © 2020 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2338-2348
JournalMindfulness
Volume11
Issue number10
Early online date24 Jul 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Jul 2020

Citation

Chan, K. K. S., & Yung, C. S. W., & Nie, G. M. (2020). Self-compassion buffers the negative psychological impact of stigma stress on sexual minorities. Mindfulness, 11(10), 2338-2348. doi: 10.1007/s12671-020-01451-1

Keywords

  • Stigma stress
  • Self-compassion
  • Self-stigma content and process
  • Depressive and anxiety symptoms
  • Social disconnectedness and loneliness
  • Lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals

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