Secondary school students' views of climate change in Hong Kong

Liz JACKSON, Ming-Fai PANG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Though there has been an increased focus on climate change in Hong Kong's educational policy and curriculum over the last decade, little is known about the impact of curricular implementation on young people's environmental and climate change-related views, attitudes, awareness, or behaviors. This paper examines the state of climate change education in Hong Kong based on findings from a multi-pronged investigation. The main research questions addressed are: (1) what are Hong Kong secondary students’ understandings of and attitudes towards climate change issues? and (2) is there any significant difference between students studying in local and international schools in Hong Kong? The paper provides a content analysis of climate change curriculum in local and international schools. It reports on a large-scale survey of international and local school students’ environmental attitudes, and on qualitative interviews of their awareness and behaviors related to climate change. We conclude with reflections on the implications of this study for climate change education in Hong Kong in the future and vital areas for further research. Copyright © 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)180-192
JournalInternational Research in Geographical and Environmental Education
Volume26
Issue number3
Early online date16 May 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Citation

Jackson, L., & Pang, M.-F. (2017). Secondary school students' views of climate change in Hong Kong. International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education, 26(3), 180-192. doi: 10.1080/10382046.2017.1330036

Keywords

  • Climate change education
  • Hong Kong
  • Secondary schooling
  • Environmental attitudes
  • Climate change

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Secondary school students' views of climate change in Hong Kong'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.