Schooling’s contribution to a sustainable future in Asia: Can schools develop ‘green’ citizens?

Kerry John KENNEDY, Kui Foon CHOW

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

This chapter draws on data from five Asian societies that participated in the International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS). Samples of students from the Republic of Korea, Hong Kong, Taipei, China, Indonesia and Thailand, aged approximately 15 years, answered a number of questions that tested their knowledge of issues related to sustainable development, and teachers and school principals were also asked to indicate the opportunities that were provided for students to engage with these issues both inside and outside school. The results showed that while environmental education appears to be part of the school curriculum across the region, its outcomes are uneven and the opportunities for students to engage with real-world environmental problems are also uneven. Suggestions are made as to how this situation can be improved. Copyright © 2013 Asian Development Bank. The book is published with open access at SpringerLink.com.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSkills development for inclusive and sustainable growth in developing Asia-Pacific
EditorsRupert MACLEAN, Shanti JAGANNATHAN, Jouko SARVI
Place of PublicationDordrecht
PublisherSpringer
Pages345-367
ISBN (Electronic)9789400759374
ISBN (Print)9789400759367
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Citation

Kennedy, K. J., & Chow, J. K. F. (2013). Schooling’s contribution to a sustainable future in Asia: Can schools develop ‘green’ citizens? In R. Maclean, S. Jagannathan, & J. Sarvi (Eds.), Skills development for inclusive and sustainable growth in developing Asia-Pacific (pp. 345-367). Dordrecht: Springer.

Keywords

  • School curriculum
  • Environmental activity
  • Environmental organization
  • Asian society
  • Environmental knowledge

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Schooling’s contribution to a sustainable future in Asia: Can schools develop ‘green’ citizens?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.