School music education in Hong Kong after returning to China: Policy, curriculum, and teaching practice

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Following the return of sovereignty to China in 1997, education reform in Hong Kong has been initiated and implemented on a massive scale. The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) Government has made a concerted effort to improve the quality of education through the reforms, a point witnessed by the creation of a number of different policies and strategies over the course of the past decade. This chapter reviews the music curriculum reforms of 2002, and examines how education policy has impacted on school practices as a result. In the process, various issues, including the place of music in the school curriculum, assessment for learning, the motivation to learn, the nurturing of creativity, and the balance between Western and Chinese culture, are all examined. Copyright © 2017 Palgrave Macmillan.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPalgrave handbook of global arts education
EditorsGeorgina BARTON, Margaret BAGULEY
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages203-217
ISBN (Print)9781137555854, 9781137555847
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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music lessons
teaching practice
Hong Kong
curriculum
reform
China
music curriculum
school
education
sovereignty
creativity
music
learning

Citation

Leung, B.-W. (2017). School music education in Hong Kong after returning to China: Policy, curriculum, and teaching practice. In G. Barton, & M. Baguley (Ed.), Palgrave handbook of global arts education (pp. 203-217). London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Keywords

  • Music education
  • Arts education
  • Hong Kong
  • Arts education policy
  • China
  • Policy
  • Curriculum
  • Curriculum reform
  • Teaching practice
  • Cultural policy
  • Motivation in music learning
  • Cantonese opera
  • Assessment
  • Assessment for learning
  • Creativity
  • Chinese culture
  • Local culture