School knowledge, the state and the market: an analysis of the Hong Kong secondary school curriculum

Paul James Thomas Francis MORRIS

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

This paper explores the differential status and validity accorded to subjects in Hong Kong secondary schools and analyses the structures and processes which maintain the nature of school knowledge. It initially focuses on the central role played by the state and subsequently by the market in which schools compete for pupils. It is argued that the curriculum continues to manifest those characteristics which emerged in the early postwar period, which was characterized by direct state control. The outcome is a curriculum which contains those features associated with a collection code: closed systems; disciplinary modes of conceptualizing knowledge; and a focus on public knowledge, despite the Government's attempts, over the last two decades, to promote a curriculum which displays the opposite features. Copyright © 2003 Open University of Hong Kong Press.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCurriculum, learning and assessment: The Hong Kong experience
EditorsPhilip STIMPSON, Paul MORRIS, Yvonne FUNG, Ronnie CARR
Place of PublicationHong Kong
PublisherOpen University of Hong Kong Press
Pages47-76
ISBN (Print)9627707376
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Citation

Morris, P. (2003). School knowledge, the state and the market: An analysis of the Hong Kong secondary school curriculum. In P. Stimpson, P. Morris, Y. Fung, & R. Carr (Eds.), Curriculum, learning and assessment: The Hong Kong experience (pp. 47-76). Hong Kong: Open University of Hong Kong Press.

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