School knowledge, the state and the market: An analysis of the Hong Kong secondary school curriculum

Paul James Thomas Francis MORRIS

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18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the differential status and validity accorded to subjects in Hong Kong secondary schools and analyses the structures and processes which maintain the nature of school knowledge. It initially focuses on the central role played by the state and subsequently by the market in which schools compete for pupils. It is argued that the curriculum continues to manifest those characteristics which emerged in the early postwar period, which was characterized by direct state control. The outcome is a curriculum which contains those features associated with: a collection code; closed systems; disciplinary modes of conceptualizing knowledge; and a focus on public knowledge, despite the government's attempts, over the last two decades, to promote a curriculum which displays the opposite features. Copyright © 1997 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-350
JournalJournal of Curriculum Studies
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1997

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Hong Kong
secondary school
curriculum
market
school
government supervision
post-war period
pupil
Group

Citation

Morris, P. (1997). School knowledge, the state and the market: An analysis of the Hong Kong secondary school curriculum. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 29(3), 329-350.