Ritual and non-ritual Daoist music at Fung Ying Seen Koon: Their role, transmission, sustainability and challenges in Hong Kong

Ming Chuen Allison SO

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

Daoism is a religious and philosophical indigenous tradition in China with over four thousand years of history, and music forms an integral part in Daoist rituals and ceremonies. The purpose of this study is to investigate the ritual and non-ritual music in one of the most popular Daoist temples in Hong Kong – the Fung Ying Seen Koon. An observation on selected part of two rituals – Ritual of Praising the Constellations and Ritual of the Big Dipper were analysed and reported, in particular, the role of music and the role of devotees in these ceremonies. The final part of this chapter focuses on the transmission and sustainability of Daoist music in Hong Kong, and the Daoist Orchestra is chosen as example which aims at both Daoist and non-Daoist audiences in the community. The chapter concludes with the challenges facing Daoist music in Hong Kong. Copyright © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTraditional musics in the modern world: Transmission, evolution, and challenges
EditorsBo-Wah LEUNG
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherSpringer
Pages223-242
ISBN (Electronic)9783319915999
ISBN (Print)9783319915982
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Citation

So, M.-C. A. (2018). Ritual and non-ritual Daoist music at Fung Ying Seen Koon: Their role, transmission, sustainability and challenges in Hong Kong. In B.-W. Leung (Ed.), Traditional musics in the modern world: Transmission, evolution, and challenges (pp. 223-242). Cham: Springer.

Keywords

  • Daoism
  • Daoist music
  • Ritual
  • Chants
  • Ritual of praising the constellations
  • Ritual of the big dipper

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