Resilience in the year after cancer diagnosis: A cross-lagged panel analysis of the reciprocity between psychological distress and well-being

Wai Kai HOU, Hiu Ming John LAM

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26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined prospective reciprocity between psychological distress and subjective well-being and the role of change in psychosocial resources in the reciprocity in the year following cancer diagnosis. Psychological distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), subjective well-being (Chinese Affect Scale and Satisfaction with Life Scale), and psychosocial resources of 180 Chinese patients were assessed at diagnosis (Time 1) and at 3-month (Time 2) and 12-month (Time 3) follow-up. Cross-lagged panel analysis demonstrated significant cross-lagged effects between psychological distress and subjective well-being. Time 2 to Time 3 change in perceived collective control (i.e., control over cancer in collaboration with close social partners) significantly mediated the cross-lagged effect of Time 2 well-being on Time 3 distress, and the mediating effect was stronger at medium or higher Time 2 distress. The findings suggest that whereas distress and well-being reciprocally predict each other throughout cancer adaptation, change in perceived collective control could mediate the prospective relationship of well-being with subsequent distress. Copyright © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)391-401
JournalJournal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume37
Issue number3
Early online dateFeb 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Psychology
Neoplasms
Anxiety
Prospective Studies
Depression

Citation

Hou, W. K., & Lam, J. H. M. (2014). Resilience in the year after cancer diagnosis: A cross-lagged panel analysis of the reciprocity between psychological distress and well-being. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 37(3), 391-401.

Keywords

  • Psychological resilience
  • Psychological distress
  • Subjective well-being
  • Resource change
  • Colorectal cancer