Researching Korean children’s schooling attitude and practice in China: An ethnographic approach

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Abstract

The ethnographic study reported in this article documents an ethnic Korean elementary school student’s schooling attitude and practice behind the model minority stereotype in a bilingual Korean school in Northeast China. Using an ethnographic approach, this article focuses on observation and interview methods, which recount how the student attempts to negotiate in peer network home and school demands of schooling and struggles to obtain academic status and maintain ethnic language in daily school life. The article highlights the importance of giving children a voice perceived as a complicated phenomenon revealing the interplay between objective environment and subjective agency. The research results indicate the challenges that China’s 55 minorities face in order to achieve economic upward mobility while sustaining ethnic identities and culture at a time of transition and change, and lead us to argue that ethnic child voice is an important avenue for researchers to understand school experience among ethnic minorities within the asymmetrical power relation-ships between majority and minorities. Copyright © 2009 Brill.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial stratification in Chinese societies
EditorsKwok-bun CHAN, Agnes S. M. KU, Yin-wah CHU
Place of PublicationLeiden, The Netherlands
PublisherBrill
Pages225-245
Volume5
ISBN (Electronic)9789004182615
ISBN (Print)9789004181922
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

Citation

Gao, F. (2009). Researching Korean children’s schooling attitude and practice in China: An ethnographic approach. In K. B. Chan, A. S. M. Ku, & Y.-W. Chu (Eds.), Social stratification in Chinese societies (Vol. 5, pp. 225-245). Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill.

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