Research, development, and academic culture in Chinese universities: A historical reflection

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

As drawn from the experience of European universities during the medieval period, a university can be mainly defined as a scholarly institution for independent thought, criticism, and creativity that is governed, in large measure, by its community members (Hetherington 1965; Jaspers 1959; Martin 1972). Research is seen as a scholarly activity that helps to define the principal functions—that is, creating new knowledge, pursuing truth, and transmitting culture—that are central to a university’s identity (Newman 1959; Clark 1984). A university should maintain a certain distance and independence from the surrounding culture so that it may pursue truth without external interruptions from government, business, or religion (Moor 1993; Mori 1993). Copyright © 2015 John N. Hawkins and Ka Ho Mok.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationResearch, development, and innovation in Asia pacific higher education
EditorsJohn N. HAWKINS, Ka Ho MOK
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages225-244
ISBN (Electronic)9781137457097
ISBN (Print)9781349498574
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Academic Culture
Government
Criticism
Interruption
Medieval Period
Creativity
Religion
Thought

Citation

Pan, S.-Y. (2015). Research, development, and academic culture in Chinese universities: A historical reflection. In J, N. Hawkins, K. H. Mok (Eds.), Research, development, and innovation in Asia pacific higher education (pp. 225-244). New York, N.Y.: Palgrave Macmillan.

Keywords

  • Academic freedom
  • High education policy
  • Academic culture
  • Soviet model
  • Nationalist government