Relationships between state anxiety and reading comprehension of Chinese students with and without dyslexia: A cross-sectional design

Li-Chih WANG, Ji-Kang CHEN, Kean POON

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This cross-sectional study aims to examine the age differences in state anxiety (i.e., anxiety triggered toward specific situations) as well as its relationship to the reading comprehension of Chinese students with and without dyslexia across school ages. In total, 131 typically developing students and 81 students with dyslexia in primary and secondary school were recruited in Taiwan. Our results indicate that students with and without dyslexia have different patterns of state anxiety across the three age levels. In addition, we found similar patterns between students with and without dyslexia across the three age levels in the effects of state anxiety on reading comprehension. However, the contributions of state anxiety to reading comprehension tended to decline as typically developing students matured, while they remained relatively constant for students with dyslexia across the three age levels. These results may have implications for teaching activities or examinations for students whose state anxiety has a significant impact on their reading comprehension skills. Copyright © 2023 Hammill Institute on Disabilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)247-260
JournalLearning Disability Quarterly
Volume46
Issue number4
Early online dateJan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2023

Citation

Wang, L.-C., Chen, J.-K., & Poon, K. (2023). Relationships between state anxiety and reading comprehension of Chinese students with and without dyslexia: A cross-sectional design. Learning Disability Quarterly, 46(4), 247-260. https://doi.org/10.1177/07319487221149413

Keywords

  • State anxiety
  • Reading comprehension
  • Dyslexia
  • Chinese
  • School ages

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