Relationships among grit, academic performance, perceived academic failure, and stress in associate degree students

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the relationships among grit, academic performance, perceived academic failure, and stress levels of Hong Kong associate degree students using path analysis. Three hundred and forty-five students from a community college in Hong Kong voluntarily participated in the study. They completed a questionnaire that measured their grit (operationalized as interest and perseverance) and stress levels. The students also provided their actual academic performance and evaluated their perception of their academic performance as a success or a failure. The results of the path analysis showed that interest and perseverance were negatively associated with stress, and only perceived academic failure was positively associated with stress. These findings suggest that psychological appraisal and resources are more important antecedents of stress than objective negative events. Therefore, fostering students' psychological resilience may alleviate the stress experienced by associate degree students or college students in general. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)148-152
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume60
Early online dateSep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

Citation

Lee, W. W. S. (2017). Relationships among grit, academic performance, perceived academic failure, and stress in associate degree students. Journal of Adolescence, 60, 148-152.

Keywords

  • Stress
  • Grit
  • Academic performance
  • Perceived academic failure

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