Regulatory states in the South: Can they exist and do we want them? The case of the Indonesian power sector

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

The last 30 years or so have witnessed a near revolution in the form, function, extent, role, and practices of the modern nation-state — at least the Western nation-state.’ The state as the ultimate, all-encompassing entity that designs, finances, owns, manages, and delivers various services directly to the public has withered. Central planning, state-led development, and the state as co-ordinator and orchestrator of economic and social innovation are now artefacts of a bygone era. The “interventionist” Keynesian welfare state along with its extensive bureaucracies and command and control governance mechanisms has been progressively dismantled, while its footprint on the economic life of the state has been massively downsized. In the space of a single generation, we have witnessed one of the great transformations of the modern era: the death of the “interventionist” state and the rise of the “regulatory state” (Hood et al. 1999; Majone 1999: 1; Levi-Faur 2005). Copyright © 2014 Toby Carroll and Darryl S.L. Jarvis.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe politics of marketising Asia
EditorsToby CARROLL, Darryl S. L. JARVIS
Place of PublicationBasingstoke
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages71-100
ISBN (Electronic)9781137001672
ISBN (Print)9781137001665, 9781349433650
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Citation

Jarvis, D. S. L. (2014). Regulatory states in the South: Can they exist and do we want them? The case of the Indonesian power sector. In T. Carroll, & D. S. L. Jarvis (Eds.), The politics of marketising Asia (pp. 71-100). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Keywords

  • Regulatory state
  • Electricity sector
  • Asian development bank
  • Asian crisis
  • International finance corporation

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