Reconstructing aboriginal identity: A social-political case-study in curriculum change

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Abstract

This paper locates the development of Aboriginal Studies curricula within the context of Aboriginal political activism and 20th century reconstruction of Aboriginal identity in Australia. It is suggested that the incorporation of the reconstructed Aboriginal identity in Aboriginal Studies curricula institutionalised a radical conceptual change. Using the senior secondary Aboriginal Studies curriculum as an example, it is argued that unresolved tensions exist in the syllabus, the conceptualisation of community and the social process of identity formation inherent in recent reconstructions of Aboriginal identity. The question posed is whether these tensions will ultimately act as a form of oppression for Aboriginal people in the cross-cultural environment of contemporary Australia. Copyright © 1995 Pacific Circle Consortium.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-59
JournalPacific-Asian Education
Volume7
Issue number1-2
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1995

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curriculum
reconstruction
identity formation
syllabus
oppression
social process
community

Citation

Halse, C. (1995). Reconstructing aboriginal identity: A social-political case-study in curriculum change. Pacific-Asian Education Journal, 7(1-2), 53-59.