Reading comprehension difficulties in Chinese–English bilingual children

Xiuhong TONG, Catherine MCBRIDE, Hua SHU, Connie Suk-Han HO

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The co-occurrence of reading comprehension difficulties for first language (L1) Chinese and second language (L2) English and associated longitudinal cognitive–linguistic correlates in each language were investigated. Sixteen poor comprehenders in English and 16 poor comprehenders in Chinese, 18 poor readers in both, and 18 children with normal performance in both were identified at age 10. The prevalence rate for being poor in both was 52.94%, suggesting that approximately half of children who are at risk for Chinese reading comprehension difficulty are also at risk for English reading comprehension difficulty. Chinese word reading, phonological, and morphological awareness were longitudinal correlates of poor comprehension in Chinese. English word reading and vocabulary were longitudinal correlates of poor comprehension in English. Chinese phonological awareness was an additional correlate of poor comprehension in English. Moreover, poor comprehenders in both Chinese and English showed slower rapid automatized naming scores than the other groups. Findings highlight some factors that might be critical for reading comprehension in L1 Chinese and L2 English; fluency is likely to be a critical part of reading comprehension across languages. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-83
JournalDyslexia
Volume24
Issue number1
Early online dateSep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Citation

Tong, X., McBride, C., Shu, H., & Ho, C. S.-H. (2018). Reading comprehension difficulties in Chinese–English bilingual children. Dyslexia, 24(1), 59-83.

Keywords

  • Poor comprehender
  • Bilingual children
  • L2 learning
  • Cognitive and linguistic weakness

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