Rapid automatized naming and its unique contribution to reading: Evidence from Chinese dyslexia

Jinger PAN, Hua SHU

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

Rapid automatized naming (RAN) is suggested to be a significant predictor of reading. However, how it is related to reading and whether it contributes uniquely to reading with phonological awareness statistically controlled is unclear. In this chapter, we reported a study of 45 fourth and fifth grade Chinese children with dyslexia and 45 age-matched controls. They were administrated processing speed tasks, auditory temporal processing, RAN, phonological awareness, Chinese character recognition, and timed word list reading. Results showed that Chinese dyslexic children performed poorer than typical developing children in all tasks. And principal component analyses revealed that RAN loaded in both phonological processing and processing speed component. RAN uniquely predicted Chinese timed and untimed word reading, while phonological awareness predicted only untimed Chinese word reading. The underlying mechanism and the role of RAN in Chinese were discussed. Copyright © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationReading development and difficulties in monolingual and bilingual Chinese children
EditorsXi CHEN, Qiuying WANG, Yang Cathy LUO
Place of PublicationDordrecht
PublisherSpringer
Pages125-138
ISBN (Electronic)9789400773806
ISBN (Print)9789400773790
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Citation

Pan, J., & Shu, H. (2014). Rapid automatized naming and its unique contribution to reading: Evidence from Chinese dyslexia. In X. Chen, Q. Wang, & Y. C. Luo (Eds.), Reading development and difficulties in monolingual and bilingual Chinese children (pp. 125-138). Dordrecht: Springer.

Keywords

  • Dyslexia
  • Chinese
  • Rapid naming
  • Phonological awareness

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