Psychological distress and subjective burden of caregivers of people with mental illness: The role of affiliate stigma and face concern

Winnie W. S. MAK, Yuen Man Rebecca CHEUNG

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42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study tested the mediating role of affiliate stigma on the relationships between face concern with psychological distress and subjective burden among caregivers of people with severe mental illnesses. One hundred and eight Chinese caregivers in Hong Kong were surveyed. Based on Baron and Kenny’s (J Pers Soc Psychol 51:1173–1182, 1986) approach, affiliate stigma was found to serve as a partial mediator between face concern and caregiver distress and a full mediator between face concern and subjective burden. Cultural linkage of stigma and caregiver outcomes was identified, suggesting that researchers and practitioners should use a culturally sensitive approach to understand caregivers’ experience and alleviate their stigma. Copyright © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-274
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

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mental illness
Caregivers
caregiver
Psychology
Hong Kong
Research Personnel
science
experience

Citation

Mak, W. W. S., & Cheung, R. Y. M. (2012). Psychological distress and subjective burden of caregivers of people with mental illness: The role of affiliate stigma and face concern. Community Mental Health Journal, 48(3), 270-274. doi: 10.1007/s10597-011-9422-9

Keywords

  • Caregiving
  • Affiliate stigma
  • Face concern
  • Subjective burden
  • Psychological distress