Psychiatric symptoms and behavioral adjustment during the COVID-19 pandemic: Evidence from two population-representative cohorts

Wai Kai HOU, Tatia Mei-chun LEE, Li LIANG, Tsz Wai LI, Huinan LIU, Horace TONG, Menachem BEN-EZRA, Robin GOODWIN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

This study examined prevalences of anxiety and depression and their correlations with daily routines among Hong Kong Chinese during the COVID-19 pandemic. Random digit dialing recruited two population-representative samples of 6029 residents during a period of low infection and limited intervention (survey 1: n = 4021) and high incidence and intensive measures (survey 2: n = 2008). Prevalence of anxiety for survey 1 and survey 2 were 14.9% and 14% and depression were 19.6% and 15.3%, respectively. Increased odds of anxiety and depression were associated with disrupted routines and lower socioeconomic status in both surveys, whereas depression was inversely related to the novel preventive routine of avoiding going to crowded places in survey 1. The prevalences of anxiety and depression were higher than preceding public health/social crises. A heavier burden of psychiatric conditions was evidenced amongst people experiencing disrupted daily routines across different phases of the pandemic and without novel preventive routines in the early phase. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s).
Original languageEnglish
Article number174
JournalTranslational Psychiatry
Volume11
Early online date17 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Citation

Hou, W. K., Lee, T. M.-C., Liang, L., Li, T. W., Liu, H., Tong, H., . . . Goodwin, R. (2021). Psychiatric symptoms and behavioral adjustment during the COVID-19 pandemic: Evidence from two population-representative cohorts. Translational Psychiatry, 11. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1038/s41398-021-01279-w

Keywords

  • PG student publication

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Psychiatric symptoms and behavioral adjustment during the COVID-19 pandemic: Evidence from two population-representative cohorts'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.