Probabilistic phonotactics as a cue for recognizing spoken Cantonese words in speech

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Abstract

Previous experimental psycholinguistic studies suggested that the probabilistic phonotactics information might likely to hint the locations of word boundaries in continuous speech and hence posed an interesting solution to the empirical question on how we recognize/segment individual spoken word in speech. We investigated this issue by using Cantonese language as a testing case in the present study. A word-spotting task was used in which listeners were instructed to spot any Cantonese word from a series of nonsense sound sequences. We found that it was easier for the native Cantonese listeners to spot the target word in the nonsense sound sequences with high transitional probability phoneme combinations than those with low transitional probability phoneme combinations. These results concluded that native Cantonese listeners did make use of the transitional probability information to recognize the spoken word in speech. Copyright © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)201-210
JournalJournal of Psycholinguistic Research
Volume46
Issue number1
Early online dateApr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

Citation

Yip, M. C. W. (2017). Probabilistic phonotactics as a cue for recognizing spoken Cantonese words in speech. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 46(1), 201-210.

Keywords

  • Probabilistic phonotactics
  • Spoken word recognition
  • Speech

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