Potentiation and recovery following low and high speed isokinetic contractions in boys

Anis CHAOUACHI, Monoem HADDAD, Carlo CASTAGNA, Pui Lam WONG, Fathi KAOUECH, Karim CHAMARI, David G. BEHM

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the response and recovery to a single set of maximal, low and high angular velocity isokinetic leg extension-flexion contractions with boys. Sixteen boys (11–14 yrs) performed 10 isokinetic contractions at 60°.s-1 (Isok60) and 300°.s-1 (Isok300). Three contractions at both velocities, blood lactate and ratings of perceived exertion were monitored pretest and at 2, 3, 4, and 5 min of recovery (RI). Participants were tested in a random counterbalanced order for each velocity and recovery period. Only a single contraction velocity (300°.s-1 or 60°.s-1) was tested during recovery at each session to remove confounding influences between the recovery intervals. Recovery results showed no change in quadriceps’ power at 300°.s-1, quadriceps’ power, work and torqueat 60°.s-1 and hamstrings’ power and work with 60°.s-1. There was an increaseduring the 2 min RI in hamstrings’ power, work and torque and quadriceps’ torque with isokinetic contractions at 300°.s-1 suggesting a potentiating effect. Performance impairments during recovery occurred for the hamstrings torque at 60°.s-1 and quadriceps work with 300°.s-1. In conclusion, 10 repetitions of eitherlow or high velocity isokinetic contractions (Isok60 or Isok300) resulted in full recovery or potentiation of most measures within 2 min in boys. The potentiation effect predominantly occurred following the hamstrings Isok300 which might be attributed to a greater agonist—antagonist torque balance and less metabolic stress associated with the shorter duration higher velocity contractions. Copyright © 2011 Human Kinetics, Inc.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-150
JournalPediatric Exercise Science
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

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Torque
Physiological Stress
Lactic Acid
Leg

Citation

Chaouachi, A., Haddad, M., Castagna, C., Wong, Del P., Kaouech, F., Chamari, K., & Behm, D. G. (2011). Potentiation and recovery following low and high speed isokinetic contractions in boys. Pediatric Exercise Science, 23(1), 136-150.