Postcolonial patterns and paradoxes: Language and education in Hong Kong and Macao

Mark BRAY, Ding Yee Ramsey KOO

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The literature on postcolonialism covers a diverse set of geographic areas, cultures, timeframes, and economic and political circumstances. Within the context of this literature, this article focuses on two territories which underwent colonial transition right at the end of the twentieth century, and moved not to sovereignty but to reintegration with their motherland. Language in education systems has long been recognized not only as a very significant indicator of power relations in societies but also as a very important instrument for continuity and/or change. Hong Kong's education sector is a complex arena for language, in which English, Cantonese and Putonghua each play different and changing roles. Macao's education sector has all of these factors plus additional complexities arising from the place of Portuguese. The article notes various paradoxes in the ways that patterns developed in Hong Kong and Macao in the initial postcolonial period. It identifies lessons not only from comparison between Hong Kong and Macao, but also from comparison of experiences in the territories as a pair with experiences in other parts of the world. Copyright © 2004 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-239
JournalComparative Education
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2004

Citation

Bray, M., & Koo, R. (2004). Postcolonial patterns and paradoxes: Language and education in Hong Kong and Macao. Comparative Education, 40(2), 215-239.

Keywords

  • Postcolonialism
  • Comparative education
  • Language and history
  • Education -- History

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