Policy capacity in post-1997 Hong Kong: Constrained institutions facing a crowding and differentiated polity

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Abstract

Hong Kong has experienced a policy impasse after reunification with China in 1997. This is due not only to the erosion of old institutions and processes inherited from British colonial rule, but also the lack of “fit” between an outdated policy system and a new and more uncertain policy environment. In addition to institutional defects, newly emerging cleavages have also limited the government’s policy capacity. This article examines the growing constraints faced in governing a differentiated polity and in managing social conflict. Changes in terms of policy actors, policy habitat, policy processes, and policy thinking are examined. Copyright © 2007 Informa UK Limited.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-75
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Public Administration
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

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Hong Kong
social conflict
reunification
government policy
habitat
erosion
China
lack

Citation

Cheung B. L. A. (2007). Policy capacity in post-1997 Hong Kong: Constrained institutions facing a crowding and differentiated polity. Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration, 29(1), 51-75. doi: 10.1080/23276665.2007.10779328