Phylogenetic conservation of soil microbial responses to elevated tropospheric ozone and nitrogen fertilization

Zhengsheng YU, Qun GAO, Xue GUO, Jinlong PENG, Qi QI, Xunwen CHEN, Mengying GAO, Cehui MO, Zhaozhong FENG, Ming Hung WONG, Yunfeng YANG, Hui LI

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plant primary productivity and crop yields have been reduced due to the doubled level of global tropospheric ozone. Little is known about how elevated ozone affects soil microbial communities in the cropland ecosystem and whether such effects are sensitive to the nitrogen (N) supply. Here, we examined the responses of bacterial and fungal communities in maize soils to elevated ozone (+60 ppb ozone) across different levels of N fertilization (+60, +120, and +240 kg N ha⁻¹yr⁻¹). The fungal alpha diversity was decreased (P < 0.05), whereas the bacterial alpha diversity displayed no significant change under elevated ozone. Significant (P < 0.05) effects of N fertilization and elevated ozone on both the bacterial and fungal communities were observed. However, no interactive effects between N fertilization and elevated ozone were observed for bacterial and fungal communities (P > 0.1). The bacterial responses to N fertilization as well as the bacterial and fungal responses to elevated ozone were all phylogenetically conserved, showing universal homogeneous selection (homogeneous environmental conditions leading to more similar community structures). In detail, bacterial Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi, as well as fungal Ascomycota, were increased by elevated ozone, whereas bacterial Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Elusimicrobia, as well as fungal Glomeromycota, were decreased by elevated ozone (P < 0.05). These ozone-responsive phyla were generally correlated (P < 0.05) with plant biomass, plant carbon (C) uptake, and soil dissolved organic C, demonstrating that elevated ozone affects plant-microbe interactions. Our study highlighted that microbial responses to elevated ozone display a phylogenetic clustering pattern, suggesting that response strategies to elevated ozone stress may be phylogenetically conserved ecological traits. Copyright © 2023 Yu et al.
Original languageEnglish
JournalmSystems
Volume8
Issue number1
Early online dateJan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2023

Citation

Yu, Z., Gao, Q., Guo, X., Peng, J., Qi, Q., Chen, X., . . . Li, H. (2023). Phylogenetic conservation of soil microbial responses to elevated tropospheric ozone and nitrogen fertilization. mSystems, 8(1). Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1128/msystems.00721-22

Keywords

  • Global tropospheric ozone
  • Nitrogen fertilization
  • Maize
  • Microbial response
  • Phylogenetic conservation
  • Biomass reduction
  • Crop
  • Ozone

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