Philosophy for children in Confucian societies: In theory and practice

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

This book contributes to the theory and practice of Philosophy for Children (P4C), with a special emphasis on theoretical and practical issues confronting researchers and practitioners working in contexts that are strongly influenced by Confucian values and norms. It includes writings by prominent P4C scholars from four Confucian societies, viz., Mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Japan. These writings showcase the diversity of the P4C model, providing a platform for researchers and practitioners to tell their stories in their own Confucian cultural contexts.

The research stories in the first part of the book are concerned with assessing the impact of traditional Confucian norms, promoting critical thinking, reconstructing the notion of community of inquiry, creating moral winds, integrating philosophy into the school curriculum, and localizing teaching methods and materials. Four issues are discussed in the second part of the book: the tension between Confucianism and powerful thinking; cultural challenges for practitioners; the transformation of harmony; and the conception of family. Taken as a whole, the book provides fresh insights into whether and how P4C’s Westerninfluenced theories and practices are compromised when they are applied in non-Western, or rather Confucian, contexts.

A must-read for anyone interested in the theory and practice of P4C and Confucianism in general. Copyright © 2020 selection and editorial matter, Chi-Ming Lam; individual chapters, the contributors.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
ISBN (Electronic)9780429028311
ISBN (Print)9780367137274
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

Citation

Lam, C.-M. (Ed.). (2019). Philosophy for children in Confucian societies: In theory and practice. London: Routledge.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Philosophy for children in Confucian societies: In theory and practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.