Perfectionism in Chinese elementary school students: Validation of the Chinese adaptive/maladaptive perfectionism scale

Wai Tsz Ricci FONG, Mantak YUEN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Through validation of the Adaptive/Maladaptive Perfectionism Scale (AMPS) (Rice & Preusser, 2002), this study examined the concept of perfectionism among Chinese elementary school students in Hong Kong. A total of 599 students from fourth to sixth grades with ages ranged from 9 to 13 years were recruited on a voluntary basis and with parental consent. They completed a Chinese translation of the AMPS consisting of 27 items. The scale taps into four dimensions of perfectionism, namely: Sensitivity to Mistakes, Contingent Self-Esteem, Compulsiveness, and Need for Admiration. Confirmatory factor analysis was employed. The results supported the AMPS subscales with moderate to high internal consistencies. However, four items were subsequently deleted due to lack of significance. The findings provide methodological and practical implications for future investigations of perfectionism among Chinese students, including those with gifts and talents - a sub-group within which perfectionism is often an issue. Copyright © 2011 International Research Association for Talent Development and Excellence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-213
JournalTalent Development and Excellence
Volume3
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

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elementary school
Students
student
Aptitude
gift
self-esteem
factor analysis
Hong Kong
school grade
Parental Consent
lack
Gift Giving
Perfectionism
Self Concept
Statistical Factor Analysis
Group
Research

Citation

Fong, R. W., & Yuen, M. (2011). Perfectionism in Chinese elementary school students: Validation of the Chinese adaptive/maladaptive perfectionism scale. Talent Development and Excellence, 3(2), 203-213.

Keywords

  • Children
  • Chinese
  • Perfectionism
  • The Adaptive/Maladaptive Perfectionism Scale
  • The gifted and talented