Parental involvement and university aspirations of ethnic Korean students in China

Fang GAO, Yiu Kei TSANG

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Parental involvement in education is essential in enhancing university enrollment and maximizing the educational potentials for equality and excellence. This study utilized Perna’s (2006) model of parental involvement as social capital in interplay with other types of capital and tested the influence of educational involvement of parents upon university-going aspirations among contemporary Korean youth. A quantitative questionnaire was administered to 298 university students of Korean origin in China. Data analysis revealed that social capital was positively associated with students’ educational aspirations through parental interactions with the student and the school. The findings also confirm the value of economic and cultural capital in affecting the operation of social capital-embedded parental involvement, as manifested by the hypothesized intersecting relationship between social capital and other types of capital in this study. This study provides significant contributions to the prevalence of the interacting patterns between social capital and other types of capital, warranting continued work. Copyright © 2019 Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEducation, ethnicity and equity in the multilingual Asian context
EditorsJan GUBE, Fang GAO
Place of PublicationSingapore
PublisherSpringer
Pages215-233
ISBN (Electronic)9789811331251
ISBN (Print)9789811331244
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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social capital
China
university
student
parental involvement in education
university enrollment
cultural capital
equality
parents
data analysis
questionnaire
interaction
school
economics
Values

Citation

Gao, F., & Tsang, Y. K. (2019). Parental involvement and university aspirations of ethnic Korean students in China. In J. Gube & F. Gao (Eds.), Education, ethnicity and equity in the multilingual Asian context (pp. 215-233). Singapore: Springer.