Parafoveal processing in silent and oral reading: Reading mode influences the relative weighting of phonological and semantic information in Chinese

Jinger PAN, Jochen LAUBROCK, Ming YAN

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9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined how reading mode (i.e., silent vs. oral reading) influences parafoveal semantic and phonological processing during the reading of Chinese sentences, using the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm. In silent reading, we found in 2 experiments that reading times on target words were shortened with semantic previews in early and late processing, whereas phonological preview effects mainly occurred in gaze duration or second-pass reading. In contrast, results showed that phonological preview information is obtained early on in oral reading. Strikingly, in oral reading, we observed a semantic preview cost on the target word in Experiment 1 and a decrease in the effect size of preview benefit from first- to second-pass measures in Experiment 2, which we hypothesize to result from increased preview duration. Taken together, our results indicate that parafoveal semantic information can be obtained irrespective of reading mode, whereas readers more efficiently process parafoveal phonological information in oral reading. We discuss implications for notions of information processing priority and saccade generation during silent and oral reading. Copyright © 2016 American Psychological Association.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1257-1273
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition
Volume42
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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weighting
Semantics
Reading
semantics
experiment
Semantic Information
Saccades
Preview
Automatic Data Processing
information processing
paradigm
Costs and Cost Analysis

Citation

Pan, J., Laubrock, J., & Yan, M. (2016). Parafoveal processing in silent and oral reading: Reading mode influences the relative weighting of phonological and semantic information in Chinese. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition, 42(8), 1257-1273. doi: 10.1037/xlm0000242

Keywords

  • Parafoveal
  • Silent reading
  • Oral reading
  • Chinese
  • Preview benefit