Online learning and parent satisfaction during COVID-19: Child competence in independent learning as a moderator

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Abstract

Research Findings: This study explored the moderating effect of child competence in independent learning in relations between the amount of learning assignment, length of online learning, and parent satisfaction with children's online learning during COVID-19 imposed class suspension. The data came from an online survey conducted in Hong Kong in February 2020. The respondents were parents (N = 3381, 92.4% mothers) of primary school grades 1–6 students (Primary 1: 801, 24.1%; Primary 2: 739, 22.3%; Primary 3: 578, 17.4%; Primary 4: 547, 16.5%; Primary 5: 406, 12.2%; Primary 6: 250, 7.5%, 60 missing) who engaged in online learning during class suspension. The findings showed that both the length of online learning and the amount of assignments were related to parents' satisfaction, but these relations were qualified by the children's competence. Positive relations were found only among children who were rated as more competent in engaging in online learning independently. Practice or Policy: Together, the findings suggest that in designing online learning, consideration of children's ability to complete such learning independently will help increase parents' satisfaction. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)830-842
JournalEarly Education and Development
Volume32
Issue number6
Early online dateJul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Citation

Lau, E. Y. H., Li, J.-B., & Lee, K. (2021). Online learning and parent satisfaction during COVID-19: Child competence in independent learning as a moderator. Early Education and Development, 32(6), 830-842. doi: 10.1080/10409289.2021.1950451

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