On the usage of have, dare, need, ought and used to in Australian English and Hong Kong English

Fung King Jackie LEE, Peter COLLINS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study uses data derived from a set of elicitation tests to examine the relative popularity of the lexical and auxiliary variants of the verbs have, dare, need, ought and used to among teachers and students in Hong Kong and Australia. Australian English, it was found, favours the lexical variants, and shares patterning with American English. By contrast Hong Kong English was found to be more tolerant of the auxiliary variants (possibly a reflection of the continuing influence of British English). The students in both communities, especially the Australian students, opted more readily for the lexical variants than their teachers, suggesting that they may be more amenable to American influence. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd. 2004.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)501-513
JournalWorld Englishes
Volume23
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2004

Citation

Lee, J. F. K., & Collins, P. (2004). On the usage of have, dare, need, ought and used to in Australian English and Hong Kong English. World Englishes, 23(4), 501-513. doi: 10.1111/j.0083-2919.2004.00374.x

Keywords

  • Anthropology
  • Communication
  • English language
  • Language and languages
  • Students

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