National identity-building through the school curriculum and the two history subjects in postcolonial Hong Kong

Flora L. F. KAN, Robert Damian ADAMSON

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

Abstract

Since the retrocession of Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, the Hong Kong SAR government and key curriculum developers have been determined to make use of the school curriculum (formal and informal) and in particular, the two history subjects, 'Chinese History' and 'History,' to promote a national identity among students. This study shows that a Chinese national identity in ethnic, cultural and historical terms has been promoted through 'Chinese History.' At the same time, through the other history subject, 'History,' a Hongkongese identity that includes both an international and a national dimension has also been made possible. However, it is argued that in promoting a sense of national identity through the school curriculum, the government has turned the curriculum to a form of nationalistic propaganda. In addition, the emphasis on national identity would create tension between Hong Kong students, students from China and ethnical minority students. Copyright © 2014 National Academy for Educational Research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-53
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Educational Development
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2014

Citation

Kan, F. L. F., & Adamson, B. (2014). National identity-building through the school curriculum and the two history subjects in postcolonial Hong Kong. Asia Pacific Journal of Educational Development, 3(1), 43-53. doi: 10.6228/APJED.03.01.05

Keywords

  • National identity
  • Chinese
  • Hongkongese
  • Chinese history
  • History
  • Postcolonial

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