Modernizing public healthcare governance in Hong Kong: A case study of professional power in the new public management

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines Hong Kong's experience in modernizing and corporatizing public healthcare governance in order to enhance management autonomy and service efficiency, against the background of a previous regime of centralized departmental control and amid the worldwide trend of new public management. The reform, culminating in the establishment of a hospital authority, is found to be wrought with intense intra-bureaucratic conflict, as well as rivalries between professional and administrative bureaucrats, between professionals of different sectors, and between medical and para-medical providers. Instead of breaking up traditional professional monopoly and opening up the system to non-medical general management, corporatization has resulted in an unplanned entrenchment and re-empowerment of medical professional power. Copyright © 2002 Taylor & Francis Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-365
JournalPublic Management Review
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Citation

Cheung, A. B. L. (2002). Modernizing public healthcare governance in Hong Kong: A case study of professional power in the new public management. Public Management Review, 4(3), 343-365. doi: 10.1080/14616670210157238

Keywords

  • Corporatization
  • Healthcare finance
  • Medical managerialism
  • Professional power
  • Public hospital governance

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