Mind-sets in early childhood: The relations among growth mindset, engagement and well-being among first grade students

Wing Chung William LAM, Ronnel Bornasal KING, Siu Sze YEUNG, Ching Hsiang ZHOC

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

Abstract

Research Findings: Previous studies have found that a growth mind-set was associated with optimal learning and well-being outcomes. However, much of this research has been conducted among adolescents and young adults. Relatively little is known as to whether these associations also apply to young children. The present study aimed to examine whether mind-sets are associated with school engagement and subjective well-being in the early childhood context (i.e. first-grade students). A total of 402 Hong Kong first-grade students (219 boys and 183 girls; mean age = 6.69) were recruited. Self-reported questionnaires were administered to assess students’ growth mind-set, engagement, and subjective well-being. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Results indicated that students who endorsed a growth mind-set were more likely to report higher levels of engagement and subjective well-being. Practice or Policy: Our study demonstrates the importance of growth mind-set for optimal functioning among young children. Growth mind-set may need to be nurtured in the early childhood context as a potential pathway to improving students’ academic engagement and subjective well-being. Copyright © 2022 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEarly Education and Development
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Sep 2022

Citation

Lam, W. C., King, R. B., Yeung, S. S.-S., & Zhoc, C. H. (2022). Mind-sets in early childhood: The relations among growth mindset, engagement and well-being among first grade students. Early Education and Development. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/10409289.2022.2126656

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