Metacognitive mental imagery strategies for training of daily living skills for people with brain damage: The self-regulation and mental imagery program

Karen P.Y. LIU, Che Hin Chetwyn CHAN

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Meta-cognitive strategies are thought to assist people suffering from brain damage in relearning daily living tasks. The use of self-regulation and mental imagery as metacognitive strategies used in an intervention program is described. The program requires the clients' active participation. The evidence is gathered from two case reports, four randomized clinical trials, one controlled clinical trial, and one review paper. Copyright © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational handbook of occupational therapy interventions
EditorsIngrid SÖDERBACK
Place of PublicationNew York, NY
PublisherSpringer
Pages233-239
ISBN (Electronic)9780387754246
ISBN (Print)9780387754239
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Citation

Liu, K. P. Y., & Chan, C. C. H. (2009). Metacognitive mental imagery strategies for training of daily living skills for people with brain damage: The self-regulation and mental imagery program. In I. Söderback (Ed.), International handbook of occupational therapy interventions (pp. 233-239). New York, NY: Springer.

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