Mental health of transgender people in Hong Kong: A community-driven, large-scale quantitative study documenting demographics and correlates of quality of life and suicidality

Yiu Tung SUEN, Randolph Chun Ho CHAN, Eliz Miu Yin WONG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A community-driven survey of 106 transgender people (the first such survey in Hong Kong) showed that: (1) more than half the sample (50.9%) had a university degree or higher qualification; (2) despite this, 43.4% had a monthly income below HK$6,000 (about USD$775); (3) 66% reported “fair” or “poor” quality of life; (4) 67% of the sample (87.1% of respondents aged 15–24 years) had contemplated suicide; and (5) 20.8% of the sample (35.5% of respondents aged 15–24 years) had attempted suicide. It was found that (1) those who were single, had a lower monthly income, and identified as transgender women reported lower quality of life; and (2) those who were younger and on a lower income expressed higher suicidality. The findings suggest that service providers and policy makers urgently need to address the mental health needs of transgender people, particular younger transgender people. Copyright © 2018 Taylor & Francis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1093-1113
JournalJournal of Homosexuality
Volume65
Issue number8
Early online date27 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Citation

Suen, Y. T., Chan, R. C. H., & Wong, E. M. Y. (2018). Mental health of transgender people in Hong Kong: A community-driven, large-scale quantitative study documenting demographics and correlates of quality of life and suicidality. Journal of Homosexuality, 65(8), 1093-1113. doi: 10.1080/00918369.2017.1368772

Keywords

  • Hong Kong
  • LGBT
  • Mental health
  • Quality of life
  • Suicide attempt
  • Suicide ideation
  • Transgender

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