Marine debris from the foreshore to backshore in Hong Kong: The abundance, seasonal variations, type of debris

Oi Chuen CHOW

Research output: Other contributionHonours Projects (HP)

Abstract

The coastal environmental issues had been raised the attention from the society in these two decades. People care about the scenery and hygiene level on the beach, therefore more and more beach cleaning-up events had been launched around the world. While Hong Kong is a coastal city almost surrounded by marine, beaches are easily found as well as marine debris. By knowing the final sink of the marine debris helps people to decide and plan the waste management in long term. There were a lot of researches showing the different possible sink for the marine debris, including the wildlife animal, oceanic current, and beach. However, there is a gap between the predicted amount and the current number of marine debris. Hardesty et al., (2017) suggested that the backshore area of the beach is the final sink of the debris, which was ignored by the public. There was recent research conducted in Australia, Korea, and Taiwan, but not in Hong Kong. Therefore, this study is focusing on the marine debris found from the foreshore and backshore in order to figure out the Hong Kong marine debris distribution. There are three aims in this study: 1) The abundance, 2) Seasonal variations, 3) Different types of sources, of the marine debris found from the foreshore and backshore areas. As the result showed that the backshore accumulated more debris, and the dry season had collected more debris than the wet season. A different source of debris also has significant differences mutually.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • Honours Project (HP)
  • Bachelor of Education (Honours) (Geography) (Five-year Full-time)
  • Programme code: A5B084
  • Course code: GGP4016

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