Managing human capital in world cities: Reflections on Hong Kong developing into an education hub

Ada LAI, Rupert MACLEAN

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapters

Abstract

In order to enhance national competitiveness in a globalized economy, a number of Asian governments (such as Malaysia and Singapore) have begun to adopt policies and strategies to develop education hubs, and the education industry. Despite its very close proximity to Mainland China, the world’s largest source country of overseas students (Kritz, 2006), Hong Kong has only since 2004 become proactive in building itself into a ‘regional education hub’ and developing its education industry. Although commonly regarded as one of the four newly industrialized economies alongside Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan, Hong Kong has always been different from the others. It is not a typical ‘developmental state’ (Wade, 1990; Weiss, 1998; Woo-Cumings, 1999) where an elite bureaucracy focuses on economic objectives, plays a commanding role in taming domestic and international market forces and harnesses them to local ends. Hong Kong, instead, has always prided itself on having a small government which operates according to an economic philosophy of ‘positive non-interventionism’, where the government’s main role is to facilitate the functioning of the market, rather than assuming a directing role in the local economy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternationalization of higher education in East Asia: Trends of student mobility and impact on education governance
EditorsKa-Ho MOK, Kar Ming YU
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherRoutledge
Pages42-57
ISBN (Electronic)9781134714933
ISBN (Print)9780415705035, 9781315881607
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Citation

Lai, A., & Maclean, R. (2014). Managing human capital in world cities: Reflections on Hong Kong developing into an education hub. In K. H. Mok, & K. M. Yu (Eds.), Internationalization of higher education in East Asia: Trends of student mobility and impact on education governance (pp. 42-57). New York: Routledge.

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