Male role attitudes and self-esteem: A 3-year longitudinal study of heterosexual college students

Chun Bun Ian LAM, Eva S. LEFKOWITZ

Research output: Contribution to journalArticles

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the developmental pattern of male role attitudes and the within-person association of male role attitudes with self-esteem among college students. On four occasions across 3 years, 408 heterosexual college students (48% male; 28% Latino American, 32% African American, and 40% European American; mean age at Time 1 = 18.46 years) completed surveys. Multilevel models revealed that, although men’s male role attitudes became more traditional over the first 2 years of college and more flexible again toward the end, women’s male role attitudes remained unchanged over time. Moreover, within-person variation in male role attitudes was negatively linked to men’s, but not women’s, within-person variation in self-esteem. Findings highlight the importance of studying curvilinear changes in gender development and the adjustment implications of gender-related constructs for college-attending emerging adults. Copyright © 2016 Society for the Study of Emerging Adulthood and SAGE Publications.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)427-435
JournalEmerging Adulthood
Volume4
Issue number6
Early online dateMar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

Citation

Lam, C. B., & Lefkowitz, E. S. (2016). Male role attitudes and self-esteem: A 3-year longitudinal study of heterosexual college students. Emerging Adulthood, 4(6), 427-435.

Keywords

  • Adjustment
  • Gender
  • Self-esteem
  • Trajectories
  • College

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