Making sense of their career pathways: The work narratives of women primary school principals in Hong Kong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The under-representation of women school leaders has been an important concern in the field of educational management and leadership. The traditional focus (Hoyle, 1969; Lortie, 1969; Tropp, 1959) tends to blame women’s deficiencies and orientation for this underrepresentation. Women are said to lack confidence, self-esteem, role models, aspiration and career planning as well as to be more family than career oriented and to prefer teaching and interacting with children to leading and managing (see also Chapter 3 and Chapter 6). Copyright © 2014 Anita K. W. Chan.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInequalities in the teaching profession: A global perspective
EditorsMarie-Pierre MOREAU
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages157-178
ISBN (Electronic)9781137328601
ISBN (Print)9781137328595, 9781349460410, 1137328592
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

primary school
Hong Kong
principal
career
narrative
career planning
role model
self-esteem
confidence
leadership
leader
lack
Teaching
management
school

Bibliographical note

Chan, A. K. W. (2014). Making sense of their career pathways: The work narratives of women primary school principals in Hong Kong. In M.-P. Moreau (Ed.), Inequalities in the teaching profession: A global perspective (pp. 157-178). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Keywords

  • School leader
  • Career progression
  • Social divide
  • Family balance
  • Woman leader