Longitudinal impact of self-stigma content and process on parental warmth and hostility among parents of children with autism spectrum disorder

Ka Shing Kevin CHAN, Chiu Hung Charles YIP, Chi Kin Donald LEUNG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlespeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined whether self-stigma content and process would prospectively influence parental warmth and hostility through increasing parenting stress among parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). On three occasions across two years, 441 Hong Kong parents of children with ASD provided questionnaire data. Path analyses showed that self-stigma content and process were associated with greater parenting stress, which was, in turn, associated with reduced parental warmth and increased parental hostility. Our findings reveal the longitudinal influences of self-stigma on parenting practices and demonstrate how these influences can be explained by parenting stress. Our findings also suggest the importance of supporting parents of children with ASD to mitigate self-stigma and associated parenting stress in improving their parenting practices. Copyright © 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Early online date20 Apr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Apr 2022

Citation

Chan, K. K. S., Yip, C. C. H., & Leung, D. C. K. (2022). Longitudinal impact of self-stigma content and process on parental warmth and hostility among parents of children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10803-022-05529-8

Keywords

  • Self-stigma content
  • Self-stigma process
  • Parenting stress
  • Parental warmth
  • Parental hostility
  • Autism spectrum disorder

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