Linking child autism to parental depression and anxiety: Mediating the roles of enacted and felt stigma

Ka Shing Kevin CHAN, Chi Kin Donald LEUNG

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined whether child autistic symptoms would heighten parental affective symptoms through evoking enacted stigma from the community (i.e., public and courtesy stigma) and felt stigma within the parents (i.e., vicarious and self-stigma). Cross-sectional questionnaire data were collected from 441 parents of children with autism spectrum disorder. Path analyses showed that social communication and interaction deficits and restricted and repetitive behaviors in child autism were positively associated with public and courtesy stigma. While public stigma was positively associated with parental vicarious stigma, courtesy stigma was positively associated with parental self-stigma. Both vicarious and self-stigma were positively associated with depressive and anxiety symptoms among parents. Findings revealed how child autism could compromise parental well-being through exacerbating the family’s stigmatizing experiences. Copyright © 2020 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Early online date10 Jun 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Jun 2020

Citation

Chan, K. K. S., & Leung, D. C. K. (2020). Linking child autism to parental depression and anxiety: Mediating the roles of enacted and felt stigma. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10803-020-04557-6

Keywords

  • Child autistic symptoms
  • Public stigma
  • Courtesy stigma
  • Vicarious stigma
  • Self-stigma
  • Parental affective symptoms
  • PG student publication

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