Lifelong learning, learning to learn and metacognition (The missing element): A response to the rhetoric of Hong Kong science education reform

Gregory Peter THOMAS

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Hong Kong has embarked on a raft of educational reforms and prominent amongst them is a call for school students to 'learn to learn' so they can be lifelong learners. Such a reform direction is common in many countries as the demands of knowledge economies become increasingly clear and politicized. However, the extent to which such a goal is achievable depends significantly on the nature of the school and classroom learning environments in which students and teachers participate. This paper argues that many of the conditions necessary for developing metacognition, an essential requirement for 'learning to learn' and lifelong learning, are still lacking in relation to the context of science education in Hong Kong. It suggests reform directions that, if implemented, would positively impact on school and classroom learning environments and increase the possibilty that 'learning to learn' and lifelong learning might rise above the rhetoric of reform in Hong Kong.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

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lifelong learning
Hong Kong
rhetoric
reform
learning environment
science
school
learning
education
classroom
knowledge economy
educational reform
student
teacher

Citation

Thomas, G. P. (2004, April). Lifelong learning, learning to learn and metacognition (The missing element): A response to the rhetoric of Hong Kong science education reform. Paper presented at the Pacific Circle Consortium 28th Annual Conference: Civic Values and Social Responsibility in a Global Context, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, China.

Keywords

  • Secondary Education
  • Educational Evaluation